Dressing as a D&D Cleric

Dressing as a D&D Cleric

Clerics are one of the most popular classes in D&D to play. However, its appearance and background can vary greatly. There are multiple aspects to a cleric that can affect not only its appearance but also how the cleric acts in Dungeons and Dragons. In this post, we look at how to dress as a D&D cleric as well as the different aspects that you should consider in the process.

Domains and Deities of Clerics

Whether you are creating a D&D cleric in the game or as a real-life persona, there are two major aspects that must be chosen first. In D&D, a cleric must choose a domain. There are seven main domains with other ones added in additional source books. These main domains include Knowledge, Life, Light, Nature, Tempest, Trickery, and War. There is also the domain of Death for villainous clerics.

The other major aspect is whether a cleric follows a deity or not and which one. A cleric usually follows a specific deity. There are several game-based deities in addition to the acceptance of the Norse, Greek, Celtic, and Egyptian pantheons.

The choice of domain and deity will heavily affect a cleric’s appearance and aesthetic. Depending on the deity, different items and weapons make more sense than others. For example, choosing a god of crafting or mining as a character’s deity may mean that the character carries a hammer rather than a sword. We will discuss weapons a little bit later.

Regardless of deity or domain, there are a couple of outfit styles to choose from when you are dressing as a D&D cleric. A popular look is long and flowing, so something like the Abraxas Duster Coat with the Abraxas Canvas Robe would be appropriate. Cloaks and robes are very popular choices. Meanwhile, you could choose to wear a tunic with a pair of pants. The Kasimir Canvas Trousers with the Gadaric Canvas Tunic would work well. You could even layer the Garen Suede Tunic over the top. Both outfits would look great with the Einhard Boots.

Cleric Spell Casting and Weapons

Clerics are interesting characters in that they can use both simple weapons as well as divine magic, according to the most recent edition. Earlier editions of the game did not allow the use of weaponry for clerics. In Dungeons and Dragons, simple weapons are weapons that are available to the average person in terms of both general availability and martial skill level required. This includes weapons such as hammers, clubs, and maces. Staffs are also a good choice so something like the Wood Finish LARP Staff would work well for LARP events, while the Sassafras Walking Staff would be a wooden alternative.

When it comes to casting spells, a cleric must use a holy symbol or some kind of focus. This is usually some form of an amulet, emblem, or reliquary. A reliquary is a box or container for a holy relic. Therefore, you could wear a necklace as an amulet when dressing as a D&D cleric. The Ring of the Heavens Necklace is a great example.

Of course, a cleric should have some record of his spells or prayers. Having a spellbook like the Spellbook of Visions Journal would be an appropriate accessory for a cleric. Again, the color and design choices would depend on the deity or domain. This is especially true if the deity hails from a real-world pantheon. Having a way to carry the spellbook is a good idea. You can use the Tiberius Bookkeeper for example.

Armor for Clerics

When dressing as a D&D cleric, make sure to keep the level of armour being worn in mind. Clerics have restricted access to armour. They can use light and medium armour. Only select choices in character creation can allow for the use of heavy armor such as a full suit of plate armor. Light armor is armour that is either padded or made from leather, while medium armor includes some but not all chainmail, plate armour, and scale mail. Thus, leather armor is a popular choice. You could, for example, choose to wear something like the Erend Armour Set or the Octavius Armour Set.

In addition to armour, D&D clerics also have access to shields. The design of the shield can vary, again, depending on the domain and deity involved. Something that looks Norse would be ideal for a follower of Thor like the Eirik Wooden Viking Shield, while a simple wooden shield works well for a variety of characters. The Ready For Battle Large Woodgrain Shield is one possible option for LARPing.

Functional Accessories

While a cleric has fewer accessories than some other characters like rogues, they can have some additional accessories. Easily the most popular accessory is a belt. Belts are usually a part of a cleric’s outfit. They add functionality as well. Depending on what the desired aesthetic is, either the Peasants Medieval Ring Belt or the Mattis Belt would work well. Hanging from the belt, you could have a pouch to carry simple traveling gear or coins. The Louis Medium Belt Bag is one such option. These accessories would work regardless of the domain. Some accessories could have different backstories depending on the chosen domain. For example, potion bottles like the Round Glass Bottle with Holder could contain a sacred liquid or a healing potion. Healing potions would work well within the purview of a character with the Life domain. There are different accessories that may make sense with different character backgrounds, not just their domain or deity.

Depending on deities, domains, and other factors, the aesthetic of a cleric can vary quite a bit. Within this post, we looked at how to dress as a D&D cleric as well as the different aspects of the character to consider. While there are some restrictions on the weapons and armour available, there are multiple possibilities for how a cleric can appear. How your character looks like is up to you. Hopefully, we have given you multiple ideas of what you can add to your character.

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